Summer 2013

Summer Session 1

June 24 - August 2, 2013
 

Course CRN Title Instructor
COM 002 53392     Major Books: From the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment V. White
COM 003 50944 Major Books: The Modern Crisis C. Le Gall-Scoville
COM 005          53478 Fairy Tales, Fables and Parables J. Schiesari         

COM 2. MAJOR BOOKS OF WESTERN CULTURE: FROM THE MIDDLES AGES TO THE ENLIGHTENMENT (4 units)
Victoria White, vmwhite@ucdavis.edu

TWR 8:00-10:15A
125 Olson
CRN 53392

Course Description: An introduction to some major works from the medieval period to the "Enlightenment"; close readings and discussion, supplemented with short lectures to provide cultural and generic contexts. May be counted toward satisfaction of the English Composition requirement in all three undergraduate colleges. Limited to 25 students per section; pre-enrollment is strongly advised. Emphasis is on classroom discussion of the readings, supplemented by occasional lectures. Students write short papers and take a final examination.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 4 hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of Entry-Level Writing (formerly Subject A) Requirement.

GE Credits (Old): Arts & Humanities and Writing Experience.
GE Credits (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures and Writing Experience.
(Note: This course cannot be used to satisfy a college or university composition requirement and GE writing experience simultaneously).

Textbooks:

  • Dante, Inferno (Modern Library Classics, 2005)
  • Sarah Roche-Mahdi, Silence: A Thirteenth Century French Romance (Michigan State University Press, 1999)
  • Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote (Harper Perennial, 2005)
  • William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night (Modern Library Classics, 2010)
  • Voltaire, Candide and Other Stories (Oxford University Press, 2008)
  • Chris Baldick, The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 3rd Edition (Oxford University Press, 2009)
     

COM 3. MAJOR BOOKS OF WESTERN CULTURE: THE MODERN CRISIS (4 units)
Cloe Le Gall-Scoville, clegalls@ucdavis.edu

TWR 11:00-1:15P
125 Olson
CRN 50944

Course Description: An introduction, through class discussion and the writing of short papers, to some of the great books of the modern age, from Goethe's Faust to Beckett's Waiting for Godot. Limited to 25 students per section; pre-enrollment is strongly advised. Emphasis is on classroom discussion of the readings, supplemented by occasional lectures. Students write short papers and take a final examination.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 4 hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of Entry-Level Writing (formerly Subject A) Requirement.

GE Credits (Old): Arts & Humanities and Writing Experience.
GE Credits (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures and Writing Experience.
(Note: This course cannot be used to satisfy a college or university composition requirement and GE writing experience simultaneously).

Textbooks:

  • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust I & II (Goethe: The Collected Works, Vol 2) (Princeton University Press, 1994)
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment (Vintage, 1993)
  • Albert Camus, The Stranger (Vintage, 1989)
  • Sigmund Freud, Civilization and its Discontents (W.W. Norton & Company, 2010)
  • Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, 2nd Edition (W.W. Norton & Company, 2012)
     

COM 5. Fairy Tales, Fables and Parables (4 units)
Juliana Schiesari, jkschiesari@ucdavis.edu

MTW 2:10-4:25P
125 Olson
CRN 53478

Course Description: This course investigates the genres of fables, fairy tales, and parables from the ancient to the modern world. Traversing the globe, this course is a "genre" course that discusses the origin and development of the popular (or folk) genres of fables, fairy tales, and parables, and follows their development and evolution into their modern forms. The class surveys the social, political, anthropological, psychological, and literary elements of these genres in their various incarnations throughout time and space primarily as literature that would result in the modern novel.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Prerequisite: Completion of Entry-Level Writing (formerly Subject A) Requirement.

GE Credits (Old): Arts & Humanities and Writing Experience.
GE Credit (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Textbooks:

  • Carlo Collodi, Pinocchio (NYRB Classics, 2008)
  • Maria Tatar, The Classic Fairy Tales (W.W. Norton & Company, 1999)
  • J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan: Peter and Wendy and Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens (Penguin Classics, 2004)
     

Summer Session II

August 5 - September 13, 2013
 

Course CRN Title Instructor
COM 004 70963     Major Books of the Contemporary World          G. Montenegro
COM 168A          70965 Romanticism S. McLean         

COM 4. MAJOR BOOKS OF THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD (4 units)
Giovanna Montenegro, gmontenegro@ucdavis.edu

MTW 2:10-4:25P
1342 Storer
CRN 70963

Course Description: Comparative Literature 4 is designed to emphasize the investigation, through a variety of reading strategies and intensive writing assignments, of a diverse range of ethnic and cultural literatures.  In this course we will read literary works from Colombia, Martinique, the United States, Germany, Cuba, Chile and other parts of the world written after WWII. The major theme we will discuss is resistance amidst the aftermath of colonialism, empire, and violence. Through the various works we read and the films we view we will identify individual and cultural responses to occupation and violence. Especially of interest to us in this course will be the struggle of individuals to define their own sense of identity and freedom, often in the face of societal expectations which conflict with personal desires. This literature, possibly seen as literature of revolt or resistance, attempts to find and develop philosophical and aesthetic responses to the rapidly changing world of the late twentieth century. In this light we will look at several artistic works that portray race, ethnicity, gender, economic class, sexual preference, religion, political and ideological orientation as factors by which society often tries to classify and judge its individual members. In addition to these specific issues, we will also focus on the arts of reading and writing.  The goal of this class is to encourage each of you to develop new levels of excellence in your ability to read, discuss, interpret and appreciate literary works and films, as well as to express your ideas in clear, well thought-out and grammatically correct prose.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 4 hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of Entry-Level Writing (formerly Subject A) Requirement.

GE Credits (Old): Arts & Humanities, Domestic Diversity and Writing Experience.
GE Credits (New): Arts & Humanities, Visual Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.
(Note: This course cannot be used to satisfy a college or university composition requirement and GE writing experience simultaneously).

Textbooks:

  • Gabriel Garciá Márquez, Of Love and Other Demons (Vintage, 2008)
  • Isabel Allende, The House of the Spirits (Bantam, 1993)
  • Mariama Bâ, So Long a Letter (Waveland Press, 2012)
  • Toni Morrison, Beloved (Vintage, 2004)
  • Patrick Chamoiseau, Solibo Magnificent (Anchor, 1999)
  • Reinaldo Arenas, Before Night Falls (Penguin Books, 1994)
     

COM 168A. ROMANTICISM (4 units)
William Scott McLean, wsmclean@ucdavis.edu

MW 11:00-1:30P
141 Olson
CRN 70965

Course Description: This is an introduction to the Romantic movement with emphasis upon Romantic concepts of the self, irony, love, the imagination and artistic creativity, and the relationship of the individual to nature and society. Romanticism as a historical movement began in Germany and England and then spread to France, Italy, Spain, Russia and the USA. Romanticism is a quintessentially international movement that came into being as an almost worldwide response to such cultural and sociopolitical events as the French Revolution, the abolitionist movement, the stirrings of first wave feminism and the colonialist enterprises of the major European powers. This course will expose students to the price paid by Europeans for the rise of urbanization and industrialization at the end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth centuries.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Prerequisite: Any introductory course in literature.

GE Credits (Old): Arts & Humanities and Writing Experience.
GE Credit (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Textbooks:

  • Duncan Wu, Romanticism: An Anthology (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012)
  • Jerome Rothenberg, et al., Poems for the Millennium, Volume 3: The University of California Book of Romantic and Postromantic Poetry (University of California Press, 2009)